fbpx

One of New Jersey's TOP dentists

Opening Hours : View Hours of Operation
  Contact : Call us: 908-232-0400

All Posts in Category: Oral Health

Top 3 Teeth Whitening Myths Debunked

Top 3 Teeth Whitening Myths Debunked

Having white teeth is a sign of health and vitality. White teeth also make a person appear more attractive since the clean white look helps to draw attention to a pretty smile. But all this presupposes that the underlying teeth and gums are actually healthy. The problem with modern teeth whitening is that it can actually give a false impression of oral health where there really isn’t any. Teeth that have been chemically whitened aren’t necessarily in great condition. Here are the top three teeth whitening myths debunked.

Myth # 1 : Whiter Teeth Means They Are Healthy Teeth

white teeth

 

There’s a myth that whiter teeth equal healthy teeth. But that simply isn’t true. Just because you bleach out a tooth so it’s gleaming white doesn’t mean that there are no issues with that tooth. Children often have whiter teeth because they haven’t been exposed to the things that cause teeth discoloration like alcohol and tobacco products. Children with white teeth may have healthier teeth, but even they may have underlying problems with their teeth. In other words, having white teeth, whether it’s a child or an adult, does not mean that the teeth are necessarily healthy.

The converse is also true. Stained, yellow teeth may be perfectly healthy. They may have a thick layer of enamel and no cavities. The gums may be in pristine condition. The teeth are simply stained due to being exposed to foods or beverages that stain teeth. The yellowing could be a simple cosmetic issue that makes the teeth appear as if they are bad teeth. In fact, not everyone has white teeth, to begin with. The natural hue of the teeth varies from person to person. It depends on genetics as well as the individual makeup of the person’s body. In fact, having whiter teeth may give the person themselves a false sense of security as far as their overall oral health. They may think that if they look in the mirror and see white teeth that they can skip going to the dentist. That couldn’t be further from the truth.

Myth # 2: Cosmetic Teeth Whitening Focuses On Appearance And Not So Much On Healthy Teeth

Cosmetic Teeth Whitening

When you go to the dentist to get teeth whitening treatments, you probably assume that, like you, the dentist is focused solely on transforming your teeth into pearly whites. And why wouldn’t you think that? You made an appointment to have your teeth whitened, that’s what the dentist does, and that’s the charge that appears on your bill. However, a quality dentist is never solely focused on the cosmetic appearance of your teeth. Every time you sit in your dentist’s chair, they take the opportunity to evaluate the health of your teeth. In fact, if the dentist detects some unusual situations, they may not want to give you the teeth whitening treatment.

Teeth whitening formulations can actually be harmful to your teeth if they are in bad condition. If you have cracks, crevices or cavities, the chemicals in the teeth whitening formulas may cause undue discomfort or worse. That’s why your teeth whitening appointment isn’t really all about making your teeth whiter. Surprisingly, making an appointment for professional teeth whitening at your dentist office is one of the best things you can do to get an extra dental examination that could uncover potential problems like tooth decay, cavities, gum disease and more. If your dentist does discover a problem, you may still be able to get your teeth whitened, but you may get a recommendation to make another appointment to have the other situation taken care of as soon as possible.

Myth # 3: The Only Way To Achieve A Whiter Smile Is To Use Whitening Kits

At-Home Teeth Whitening Kit

Ever since teeth whitening became so popular, dozens of over the counter teeth whitening kits have hit drugstores and supermarkets. There are even television commercials that try to shame people for having less than perfectly white teeth. These advertisements encourage people to go to the drugstore to get a whitening kit. The marketing gimmick is that whiter teeth are just a whitening kit away. In reality, there are much better and safer ways to get whiter teeth.

The best way to get whiter teeth fast is to make an appointment with your dentist for a professional teeth whitening treatment. This will also give your dentist the chance to examine your overall oral health. But there are also ways to keep your teeth looking whiter without even having to go to get professional teeth whitening at the dentist’s office. First, maintaining the practice of brushing, flossing and rinsing after each meal for at least 2-4 minutes will help keep your teeth from staining from food and drink. Second, abstain from eating and drinking certain foods and beverages that are known to stain teeth. These include red wine, blueberries and more. Of course, no one wants to omit healthy blueberries from the diet. But if you do eat berries, be sure to brush and rinse immediately after.

If you are a smoker, you probably have noticed that the nicotine has stained your teeth yellow. If you get your teeth whitened at the dentist and want to keep them looking that way, the smoking will have to stop. There’s no preventing nicotine from staining your teeth without complete abstinence. Another thing you can do to help keep your teeth white is to brush with fresh crushed strawberries every so often. The acidic nature of the strawberries helps get rid of any existing stains. Finally, regular dentist visits help to keep your teeth white because the hygienist cleans away tartar and plaque buildup on your teeth.

Now that you see how there is little truth to these three teeth whitening myths, you can understand how important regular dental checkups are. Having healthy teeth means much more than a white bright smile. To keep your teeth and gums truly healthy, there’s no substitute for regular dental visits. To learn more about teeth whitening options or to schedule a visit, please contact us today.

Read More

Is Professional Teeth Bleaching Worth It?

Have you ever thought about having your teeth bleached? With today’s modern dentistry, no one has to suffer from stained, yellowed teeth. There are numerous methods to achieve whiter teeth, but they are not all equal as far as safety and effectiveness. If you’re still on the fence about having your teeth bleached, here are some things that will help you decide if professional teeth bleaching is worth it.

The Benefits of a Whiter Smile

Once you have your teeth whitened, you won’t believe the difference in how you look and feel. There are so many unexpected benefits to a whiter smile, including a higher self-esteem. When your smile is brighter, you simply feel better about yourself. You may find that you are more inclined to socialize and that when you do go out, you get more positive responses from others. Since whiter, brighter teeth naturally make you smile more, others will smile back at you. The whole feeling of joy is enhanced when you have a whiter smile.

The Drawbacks of DIY Teeth Whitening Kits

In any drugstore, you can find DIY teeth whitening kits. These kits promise you the same results as a dentist. However, the realities are quite different. DIY teeth whitening kits don’t work as well as professional teeth bleaching. Because the ingredients are not as potent, you simply won’t see the same results. Another reason to avoid DIY teeth bleaching kits is that you may have underlying oral health issues that could be exacerbated by using an over the counter teeth bleaching kit. Finally, DIY teeth bleaching kits don’t give lasting results the way that professional teeth whitening services do. While you think you are saving a few dollars, you’ll actually spend more because you have to do the process repeatedly. In turn, that excess home teeth whitening could be damaging your tooth enamel. Play it safe. Invest in professional teeth whitening instead of using a DIY teeth bleaching kit.

How Professional Teeth Bleaching Works

First, your dentist will do a thorough examination to ensure that you don’t have any underlying oral health issues that may preclude you from getting teeth whitening.

Next, you’ll be given an option for an option for a fast, one-hour teeth whitening service. Your dentist in NJ offers one-hour teeth whitening. With this service, you could arrive for a lunchtime appointment and be back at work the same day, with a whiter, brighter smile.

How Long Does Professional Teeth Whitening Last?

The results of your professional teeth bleaching can last forever, as long as you care properly for your teeth. Over time, some people find that they want to have their teeth whitened again. This is usually because certain diets and lifestyle habits can yellow and stain teeth. Common causes include red wine, blueberries, nicotine, certain curries, and food dyes that are found in some foods. The best part is, even tough stains can be removed when you get professional teeth whitening services from a dentist.

How about it? Are you ready to see the difference a white smile can make in your life? Contact us for an appointment today!

Read More

Do You Need Professional Care for Your Toothache?

Whether it is a dull ache that comes and goes or the pain is one that throbs nearly constantly, a toothache is one of those medical conditions that can be difficult for someone to tell just how serious it is without a professional evaluation.

Common Causes of Toothache Pain

Many people might be surprised to learn that the most common reason for a toothache is the presence of either a dental cavity or tooth decay. This is why even the most minor toothache pain should be evaluated by a dentist to determine its underlying cause.

Gum disease often causes toothache pain as well. Without a professional exam by a dental team, however, it’s nearly impossible for someone to know if their oral issues are minor or serious. In fact, even seemingly minor issues like a cavity can lead to tooth decay and gum disease if it isn’t treated promptly and properly by a dentist.

An injury to the mouth or directly to a tooth can also be the origination of a toothache. An abscessed tooth can cause toothache pain as well. This pocket of pus that is the result of a bacterial infection can form in a myriad of places in your mouth.

Does Your Toothache Get Worse at Night?

Many people find that their toothache pain doesn’t bother them very much throughout the day but that it makes its presence known as they are trying to get to sleep. This often leads to the thought that the problem must not be very serious or else the toothache would be unbearable all throughout the day. This is a false assumption that can lead to further problems if not dealt with promptly.

Some people experience a toothache that is the result of issues that are not related to the teeth. For example, if your teeth begin to throb at night when you try to go to sleep, the cause could be sinus problems that have trapped mucous. Once you are lying down, the blood puts more pressure on your sinuses which can lead to a toothache.

Could Seasonal Allergies be Causing Your Toothache?

If you’re sneezing, blowing your nose and wiping your watering eyes as you struggle to deal with seasonal allergies, you probably aren’t thinking about their connection to your oral health. This is where your body’s defense mechanisms in the form of your sinuses could lead to tooth pain, especially in the area of your upper molars. This is because swollen sinuses can push down on the roots of these teeth and cause you to have discomfort.

One way to determine if it’s allergies causing your toothache is to try an over-the-counter antihistamine and see if your toothache disappears. If it does not, if your pain continues even after your allergy symptoms are relieved or if you feel tooth pain somewhere else besides your upper molars, an appointment with your dentist is in order.

A toothache that lasts more than a few days should also be evaluated by a dentist. Not only can the true cause be found but you can get pain relief. Contact Creative Dentist to schedule an appointment today.

Read More
types of mouthwash

Mouthwash 101: Types of Mouthwash

If you’ve ever seen a mouthwash commercial, you know that mouthwashes are commonly used to freshen breath, but that’s not all mouthwash can do! As a part of a solid brushing and flossing routine, mouthwash can be very beneficial. However, stroll down the oral care aisle, and you’ll find yourself face to face with an aisle full of mouthwash. Why are there so many types of mouthwash? Which one do you need? This post will give you the scoop on mouthwash.

What is Mouthwash?

Mouthwash is a liquid that is swished in the mouth for a certain length of time, ranging from 30 seconds to one minute, depending on the product. The FDA groups mouthwashes into three types of categories:

  • Therapeutic: Therapeutic mouthwashes contain specific ingredients that assist in fighting tooth or mouth diseases. An example of a therapeutic mouthwash is an anti-gingivitis rinse.
  • Cosmetic: A primary goal of a cosmetic mouthwash is to remove odor-causing bacteria to freshen the breath. These are easily found over-the-counter, and they cannot treat tooth or mouth diseases.
  • Combination: A combination mouthwash serves to treat mouth conditions as well as address cosmetic concerns.

Types of Mouthwash

Mouthwash, whether it falls under the cosmetic or therapeutic category, is designed for a specific purpose. There are many types of mouthwashes including:

  • Whitening: Used in conjunction with a whitening toothpaste or perhaps even after a whitening treatment, a whitening mouthwash can maintain your pearly whites.
  • Medicated mouthwashes: Certain rinses can be prescribed to you to treat certain oral conditions such as dry mouth or bleeding gums.
  • Plaque control: These mouthwashes target plaque and work to eliminate it and stall the growth of tartar.
  • Child-friendly: These rinses typically do not have alcohol listed as an ingredient.
  • Homemade: A warm saltwater rinse is commonly used to after a tooth extraction or to help clean the mouth after an infection
  • Fluoride: Fluoride rinses can help prevent tooth decay, but it is very important that young children (or individuals who may swallow the rinse) do not use fluoride rinses as too much fluoride may be harmful.
  • Antiseptic: Many dentists suggest the use of an antiseptic rinse before and/or after surgery since these rinses contain chlorhexidine gluconate, which limits the growth of bacteria.

How do I know which mouthwash is right for me?

Although mouthwashes can be a very important part of your treatment plan, mouthwash alone should never replace brushing or flossing. If you opt for an over-the-counter mouthwash, always look for an ADA seal, which means that the American Dental Association considers that mouthwash to be safe. However, sometimes choosing an OTC mouthwash isn’t enough to address your specific dental needs. A dentist will be able to help you decide which type of mouthwash is right for you, and s/he can prescribe a medicated rinse if necessary.

If you have questions about which therapeutic mouthwash is right for your needs, your dentist can suggest an appropriate one. To make an appointment, contact us today.

Read More
burning mouth syndrome

What is Burning Mouth Syndrome?

Burning mouth syndrome is a rare but debilitating ailment that affects about 20,000 people in the U.S. each year. While treatment for burning mouth syndrome is available, at present, there is no permanent cure for the condition. If you think you or a loved one may suffer from burning mouth syndrome, read on to learn more about the symptoms, causes and available treatments, including help from Creative Dental in Westfield, NJ.

What are the Symptoms of Burning Mouth Syndrome?

Burning mouth syndrome has particular symptoms that can be used to help diagnose this condition. A medical diagnosis is needed, but you and your dentist may be able to identify symptoms that could be related to burning mouth syndrome.

The areas affected by burning mouth syndrome include the tongue, inside of the cheeks, gums, lips, under the tongue, and the roof of the mouth. In some cases, the area affected may be sparse, while in others, the entire mouth is affected.

The symptoms of burning mouth syndrome can come on suddenly, or they may slowly develop over a length of time. Here are some of the symptoms of burning mouth syndrome.

  • Sensation of a scalded tongue, without being able to connect it with eating or drinking hot foods or beverages
  • Burning sensation in one or several areas of the mouth, including any part listed above.
  • Chronic dry mouth and insatiable thirst
  • Metallic or bitter taste in the mouth and/or throat
  • Decrease or absence of the sense of taste in a small patch of the tongue or all over

The timing of the symptoms of burning mouth syndrome is individual. In some persons, the symptoms happen every single day and become progressively worse as the day wears on. In others, symptoms of burning mouth syndrome are pretty steady from waking until falling asleep. In still others, symptoms of burning mouth syndrome are sporadic, with no discernible pattern.

What Causes Burning Mouth Syndrome?

There are two known types of causes of burning mouth syndrome, known as primary and secondary. The primary cause of burning mouth syndrome has to do with internal problems with the nervous system relating to sensory nerves. The possible secondary causes of burning mouth syndrome are more abundant. They include:

  • Chronic dry mouth
  • Oral fungal infection
  • Vitamin and/or mineral deficiency
  • Ill-fitting dentures
  • Allergic reactions
  • Chronic acid reflux
  • Medication side effects
  • Oral habits
  • Disorders of the endocrine system
  • Stress and/or depression
  • Soft tissue irritation

It’s important to note that while there is no cure for burning mouth syndrome itself, many of the secondary causes of burning mouth syndrome can be diagnosed and/or treated by a dentist. The only way to ensure that secondary causes are caught right away is to keep regularly scheduled appointments with your dentist.

What Treatments are Available for Burning Mouth Syndrome?

Your dentist will be the first person you can consult with about your oral health issues, and any symptoms of burning mouth syndrome that you may be experiencing. Treatment will be worked out between you, your dentist and your medical physician. Treatments may include:

  • Oral Rinses
  • Denture refitting
  • Prescription medication
  • Therapy
  • Saliva replacement products

There’s no need to suffer silently with burning mouth syndrome. If you suspect you may have this condition, contact the professionals at Creative Dental today to make an appointment. Your health depends on it!

Read More
general dentistry basics

What General Dentistry Offers

At Creative Dental, we provide general dentistry services to all of our patients. Those who need or desire specialized dental care, such as implants, cosmetic dentistry, and oral surgery, can also have those needs met at Creative Dental in Westfield, New Jersey.

What is General Dentistry?

General dentistry is the foundation of oral health care. It can be compared to general physician services. You go to your general physician to monitor and maintain your overall health. Just like that, you see your general dentist for professional attention for your overall oral health.

A general dentist is educated to help patients achieve maximum oral health through careful monitoring, maintenance, and treatment. For example, during your general dentist appointment, your dental professional will inspect your mouth for any signs of trouble, such as sores, redness, swelling, infection, and other signs of bacterial issues. Recently, it’s been proven that an unhealthy dental situation can lead to bodily issues, such as heart disease. This is why general dentistry is considered to be at the forefront of ensuring overall wellness.

Dental maintenance includes the things you do at home to keep teeth and gums clean, such as brushing, flossing, and rinsing. These are essential steps for everyday maintenance.

Why are Regular Dentist Appointments Necessary?

However, home care is just the beginning. To ensure proper oral health, regular dentist appointments are needed to prevent and tackle a wide range of oral health issues, such as tartar and plaque, receding gums and more. This is an area where your general dentist and dental hygienist plays a key role. When you come in for regular visits, teeth cleaning is straightforward and effective. The teeth cleaning process involves checking the depth of tooth “pockets.” These are areas of the gum that have pulled away from the tooth. Checking pockets helps dentists identify areas in the mouth that are either infected or more prone to infection.

The teeth cleaning process also involves scraping teeth to rid them of built-up tartar and plaque. Even those who are vigilant about brushing and flossing after every meal can have tartar and plaque accumulation. These substances harden substantially, to the point where a trained hygienist is needed to remove them from the teeth. If you fail to have regular dentist appointments, tartar and plaque build-up can ultimately lead to loose or missing teeth. The good news is, this is easily preventable through regular dentist appointments.

General Dentistry services also include filling cavities, whitening, and many other services that will make your smile healthier, whiter and brighter.

What About Dental Emergencies?

Certain issues come up now and then around oral health, including cracked or chipped teeth, inflamed gums, toothaches, and other dental emergencies. These are things that your general dentist in Westfield, New Jersey is specially qualified to deal with. During your visit to a general dentist, you’ll find that all problems with your teeth and gums can be solved, often without pain or discomfort.

The more you see your Creative Dental general dentist in Westfield, NJ, the more you’ll be able to be confident that your oral health can be optimized through regular dental visits. There are so many oral health issues that can be solved with general dentistry; it makes sense to call now for your appointment!

Read More
young woman after preventive dentistry

Understanding Preventive Dentistry

What is Preventive Dentistry?

Preventive dentistry refers to the methods used to care for your teeth so that they can remain healthy. When you use an effective preventive routine, you can prevent gum disease, cavities and other forms of dental conditions that can affect your smile.

Types of Preventive Dentistry

Preventive dental care takes place in the comfort of your home and at your dentist’s office.

  • Brushing your teeth. Brushing your teeth on a daily basis is one of the most important parts of having clean and healthy teeth. The American Dental Association recommends brushing with approved fluoride toothpaste at least twice a day or after every meal. This applies to not only your teeth but also your tongue as brushing your tongue aids in removing bacteria and can make your breath fresher.
  • Flossing. Flossing is helpful in removing bacteria and bits of food from the tight spaces that exist between your teeth. If you are wearing braces, you can use floss threaders to reach beyond the metal brackets. However, it is important that you floss correctly to avoid causing damage to your gums. If in doubt, you can speak to your dentist and request a flossing demonstration to ensure that you can benefit from the practice.
  • Dentist Visits. According to the American Dental Association, regular visits to your dentists is necessary to detecting the early signs of dental problems and ensuring that you have good oral health. You should aim for at least two visits a year so that your dentist can provide you with a professional cleaning and can examine your teeth and gums. Additional visits may be necessary if there are indications of dental issues.
  • Eating a Healthy Diet. In addition to regular cleanings, your teeth also require specific nutrients and minerals, particularly fluoride, in order to remain healthy. This requires that you consume a balanced diet and drink plenty of water. You should also avoid consuming an excessive amount of certain foods that can damage your teeth. This includes sugar in any form, which can adhere to your teeth, and acidic foods and drinks, which can erode tooth enamel.

Benefits of Preventive Dentistry

Being proactive about the health of your teeth has multiple benefits:

  • Less risk of dental issues. Preventive dentistry can lower your chances of experiencing tooth loss and other major dental issues caused by cavities, tooth decay, gum disease or other dental issues.
  • Less risk of secondary health issue. Studies have shown that poor oral health is associated with some health ailments, including heart disease, diabetes, respiratory disease, and osteoporosis, just to name a few. Maintaining good oral health can help you avoid these conditions.
  • Saves money. Preventive dentistry services are far less costly than restorative dentistry services, such crown or implant installations or root canals. Even if you have dental insurance, the costs related to having poor oral health can be very expensive.

If you have questions about what steps you can take to maintain good oral health, don’t hesitate to speak with your dentist. Your dentist can advise you of the appropriate preventive care techniques for your dental situation.

Read More
mouth body connection

The Mouth-Body Connection Could Not Be Stronger

With toothpaste ads hyper focused on fresh-smelling breath and dazzling white teeth, it’s easy to forget that the benefits of maintaining proper oral hygiene extend far beyond minty breath and pearly whites. In fact, because poor oral health can contribute to various other health issues, it becomes even more crucial to develop healthy oral habits. Need extra motivation to brush twice a day? Just read these six health issues that are affected by a good oral hygiene routine (or lack thereof).

Reduced risk of heart disease

A 2007 study published in the Harvard Health Publications linked chronic gum inflammation with heart disease. In particular, the bacteria that is known to cause periodontitis is also present in the dangerous plaque build-ups in blocked arteries. Other cardiovascular issues that can develop in conjunction with heart disease include blocked vessels and strokes. Improving oral health, particularly gum disease lowers your risk of these cardiovascular problems.

Reduce complications from diabetes

Individuals with diabetes often find it difficult for their bodies to fight infections. As poor oral health often leads to inflammation and infections, it becomes that much more difficult for a person with diabetes to fight an oral infection. Prevent gum infections by creating a proper oral routine that includes brushing after each meal and flossing daily.

Improved lung health

Just because an infection begins in your mouth doesn’t mean that the bacteria stay in your mouth. Bacteria from oral infections can easily travel to the lungs, which then increases lung problems such as inflammation. If you suspect you have an infection, call your dentist immediately before the infection grows and spreads.

Pregnancy and birth weight

While morning sickness may create its challenges by exposing the teeth to high acid levels, excellent oral health is vital for maintaining optimal health for both a pregnant mother and the baby. Experts have shown that mothers with gingivitis are at risk to give birth to babies with low birth weight. Remember to keep routine dental appointments during pregnancy and ask your dentist any questions you have regarding pregnancy and oral health.

Reduce inflammation and joint pain

While it may seem odd that inflammation and pain in joints are connected to oral health, studies show that poor oral health contributes to inflammation elsewhere in the body, and that includes joints. Particularly, the study focuses on Rheumatoid Arthritis, a disease that causes painful joint swelling. How are these two conditions linked? Scientists believe that the method of tissue destruction in gum disease is the same method of destruction in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

Improve mental health and memory

Perhaps the most obvious – yet least discussed –effect of poor oral health is on mental health. Poor hygiene, especially in the cases of decayed teeth, leads to extremely noxious breath, which can create embarrassing social situations and low self-esteem. On the other hand, a mouth free from infections, pain, or decay increases self-esteem and confidence. In addition to increased confidence, good oral health also affects memory; gingivitis has been linked to poorer scores on memory tests.

Keeping your mouth clean is more than just improving your smile; the mouth-body relationship is one that will improve your overall health.

Read More
good oral health

Why Good Oral Health Can Prevent Disease and Sickness

Tooth decay and gum disease can affect more than just your dental health. Research shows that your oral health and systemic health are closely linked. The sticky plaque that builds up on teeth is made up of millions of bacteria. If you slack on your dental care, bacteria from the mouth can lead to inflammation or infection in other parts of the body. This is even more likely if your immune system is already compromised by disease or certain medical treatments. Fortunately, good oral health can significantly reduce your risk of developing a disease and other sicknesses caused by oral bacteria.

Link Between Oral Health and Overall Health

Poor dental care can result in much more than teeth stains and the occasional cavity. In fact, bacteria from periodontal disease and inflammation of the gums can enter your bloodstream and travel to the heart. Cardiovascular disease, or heart disease, has been associated with poor dental health. In a recent study that observed the link between cardiovascular and periodontal disease, researchers found that people with diagnosed periodontal disease are four times more likely to develop a lacunar stroke.

Respiratory infection is another risk of poor oral health. Gum disease can cause you to develop infections in your lungs, such as pneumonia. These infections are caused by breathing in bacteria from infected teeth and gums over a prolonged period. According to the Infectious Diseases Society of America, people who never undergo dental checkups have an 86 percent greater risk of developing pneumonia than people who visit their dentist twice a year.

Your oral health can also affect your long-term memory and thinking skills. Bacteria from gum disease or gingivitis can reach the brain through the bloodstream or nerve channels in the head. In time, these bacteria can lead to the development of various dementias, such as Alzheimer’s disease. According to a study consisting of donated brain samples from ten people with dementia and ten people without, the bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis was found in the brain of dementia patients. These bacteria have been found to induce brain changes in Alzheimer’s patients.

Tips for Maintaining Proper Oral Hygiene

Good oral hygiene consists of a mouth free of decay and debris. Your gums should appear pink and should not hurt or bleed when you brush or floss. Also, bad breath should not be an ongoing issue. If you struggle with these issues, it’s time to enhance your oral health care. Brush at least twice a day and floss daily to prevent the development of tooth decay and gum disease. You should also visit your dentist at least twice a year for a thorough examination and cleaning.

How you care for your teeth and gums has a direct effect on the rest of your body. Your mouth is a breeding ground for bacteria and must be properly cleaned on a routine basis to keep the production of bacteria at a healthy level. Neglect your teeth and gums and your health as a whole will suffer. If you are experiencing health problems that you believe are associated with your oral health, discuss your concerns with a dentist.

Read More
Warning sign preventing dental plaque for oral health

3 Step Plan To Prevent Dental Plaque

Dental plaque is a sticky, colorless substance that is formed by food, saliva, and bacteria in our mouths. It’s what gives our teeth that fuzzy-like feeling. If plaque is not removed through regular cleaning, it can build up and harden, while also spreading further bacteria. This can also cause gum inflammation which can then lead to gum disease, cavities, and tooth decay. Furthermore, the plaque can also cause bad breath and yellowing of your teeth. The best way of defending yourself from the adverse effects of plaque is by preventing it from hardening. Follow this three-step plan to help keep harmful dental plaque at bay.

1. Practice Good Oral Health

One of the best things you can do to prevent plaque is to practice good oral healthy every day. You should be brushing your teeth thoroughly with a suitable toothbrush and toothpaste twice a day. Electric toothbrushes have been known to be particularly effective at removing all traces of plaque. Don’t forget to brush both the front and back of each tooth. This will get rid of the plaque and bacteria that is on the surface of your teeth and gums. Flossing can help you access the gaps in between your teeth, where food can get stuck, and plaque can develop. You should aim to do this a minimum of once per day. Rinsing with a recommended mouthwash twice a day can also remove plaque from hard to reach areas. As well as removing bacteria from your tongue and sides of your mouth.

2. Eating a Balanced Diet

If you eat lots of sugary, starchy food and drinks, you are increasing your chances of developing plaque buildup. So avoid cookies, sweets and soda as much as possible. Instead, introduce more fruit and vegetables into your diet. These are much kinder to teeth and can even help to neutralize plaque-forming acids. Cut down on your carbohydrates too as this is what plaque needs to form. You should be drinking eight glasses of water per day to keep your teeth and the rest of your body in top condition.

3. Visit Your Dentist Regularly

Seeing your dentist at least twice per year will help you stop dental plaque from hardening. They can professionally scale and polish your teeth, which will make it harder for plaque to harden and develop. If you do have some buildup, they can also remove this for you. Your dentist can use your check up to examine your teeth and gums more carefully. They can use their tools to see areas you might be unable to. This ensures your entire mouth is getting the care and attention it needs to stay healthy. They can also pinpoint whether you might have the early signs of gum disease, which needs to be treated sooner rather than later. Contact your dentist to schedule in your next appointment today.

The methods that make up this plan are the best ways of preventing dental plaque from developing. Plaque is something we all have, and if we keep it under control, it shouldn’t be a cause for concern. For more guidance and support, talk to your dentist.

Read More